Get Customized Training and Project Management for You and Your Business

518-290-0812 Main Number 203-770-2686 CT

info@braatheenterprises.com

Braathe Enterprises designs and delivers customized training for you and your business.

Robert Braathe, MBA has management experience with Walt Disney World Parks & Resorts, Gap Retail and Apple, Inc.

He teaches courses including Project Management, Entrepreneurship, Human Resources and Marketing at Schenectady County Community College, Hudson Valley Community College, SUNY Cobleskill and SUNY Adirondack.

Previously, he also has taught courses at Skidmore College, SUNY Delhi, Mildred Elley, Housatonic Community College and Fulton-Montgomery Community College

Michelle Przedwiecki, MPH, joined Braathe Enterprises in 2013 to bring curriculum development experience to the team. She co-teaches a number of courses with Robert and teaches Introduction to Business at SUNY Adirondack.

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Savvy Companies Hire Autistic Adults

by Makeda Heard

Savvy companies have a diverse workforce. A diverse workforce that is all inclusive includes people with disabilities. The great financial software giant SAP headquartered in Germany is one of those savvy companies that hire autistic adults. Aspiritech, Freddie Mac, the nonPareil Institute, Semperical and the Specialists Guild are other savvy companies that employ autistic adults. SAP reserves 1% of its workforce (650 positions) for autistic employees.

SAP has partnered with Specialisterne an agency that specializes in connecting autistic adults with employers. Autistic adults may find help with finding employment through Seeds for Autism and Ocatecliffs. These agencies help adults who have Asperger’s syndrome or Autism find employment.

References

Ocate Cliffs: Ocate Cliffs

Seeds for Autism: Seeds for Autism

Shumaker, L. (2013, May 24) 5 companies that leverage the unique talents of people with autism. San Francisco Chronicle.

Wang, S. (2014, Mar 27) How autism can help you land a job. Wall Street Journal

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by Kendra Hansen

It is a time to educate others about Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), a brain disorder that is categorized by difficulty with social interaction and repetitive behaviors. Because the amount of people with ASD has risen significantly over the past twenty years it is important that we learn more about it. The more we learn about the behaviors of individuals with ASD, no matter their age, the more accepting we can become.
When we talk about ASD we usually focus on raising children with autism, but what about older individuals? A large portion of children have been diagnosed with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder (HFASD). This means that they can function without significant intellectual impairment. Although HFASD is a diagnosis usually given to children, it does continue into adulthood.
Many young adults with HFASD aim to attend college. They are verbally competent and as smart as their peers, sometimes extremely gifted. Have they been successful with their goals of higher education? Are they accepted by their peers?
Getting accepted into college or remaining enrolled is very difficult for an individual with ASD. They must choose a school that is committed to serving people with a range of disabilities. Students with HFASD need support not only academically but socially. It has been found that these students feel socially isolated and even singled out because of their differences. Intellectually they are ready for higher education but they lack the necessary social skills and have difficulty living without supervision. This results in exclusion and could lead to an increase in aggressive behavior.
A study was conducted to assess the openness of college students towards common ASD characteristics. Engineering students were found to be the most accepting because of their own introverted characteristics. Physical science students were found to have the highest inclination of spending their free time with ASD students because they believed the person to be likeable and of equal intelligence. However, the rest of the student population found peers with ASD characteristics odd and off-putting.
In their article about Autism, Rose Nevill and Susan White suggest a way to improve the acceptance of ASD college students. “Since the 1970s, the Autism Society of America has celebrated April as Autism Awareness month, with the primary goal of educating the public on this disorder and the issues it currently faces with the community. University student organizations could use this month to provide increased information to student bodies on ASD and its increased prevalence. This provision of explanatory information on ASD to students on college campuses can help decrease negative evaluations and promote peer acceptance” (Nevill, 1626).
Raising awareness about Autism is key, especially for young adults attending college. You can show support by reading and sharing articles, using hashtags, painting your nails blue, dying your hair or installing blue light bulbs. Together, we can make a better learning environment for college aged students diagnosed with ASD or HFASD.

Sources:

Nevill, Rose, and Susan White. “College Students’ Openness Toward Autism Spectrum Disorders: Improving Peer Acceptance.” Journal Of Autism & Developmental Disorders 41.12 (2011): 1619-1628. CINAHL Complete. Web. 13 Apr. 2015.

VanBergeijk, E, A Klin, and F Volkmar. “Supporting More Able Students On The Autism Spectrum: College And Beyond.” Journal Of Autism & Developmental Disorders 38.7 (2008): 1359-1370. CINAHL Complete. Web. 13 Apr. 2015.

White, Susan W., Thomas H. Ollendick, and Bethany C. Bray. “College Students on the Autism Spectrum.” Sage Publications 15.6 (2011): 683-701. Web. 13 Apr. 2015.

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April-Autism Awareness Month

by Jessica Wilkinson

April is Autism Awareness month. It is a time to educate others about Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), a brain disorder that is categorized by difficulty with social interaction and repetitive behaviors. Because the amount of people with ASD has risen significantly over the past twenty years it is important that we learn more about it. The more we learn about the behaviors of individuals with ASD, no matter their age, the more accepting we can become.

When we talk about ASD we usually focus on raising children with autism, but what about older individuals? A large portion of children have been diagnosed with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder (HFASD). This means that they can function without significant intellectual impairment. Although HFASD is a diagnosis usually given to children, it does continue into adulthood.

Many young adults with HFASD aim to attend college. They are verbally competent and as smart as their peers, sometimes extremely gifted. Have they been successful with their goals of higher education? Are they accepted by their peers?

Getting accepted into college or remaining enrolled is very difficult for an individual with ASD. They must choose a school that is committed to serving people with a range of disabilities. Students with HFASD need support not only academically but socially. It has been found that these students feel socially isolated and even singled out because of their differences. Intellectually they are ready for higher education but they lack the necessary social skills and have difficulty living without supervision. This results in exclusion and could lead to an increase in aggressive behavior.

A study was conducted to assess the openness of college students towards common ASD characteristics. Engineering students were found to be the most accepting because of their own introverted characteristics. Physical science students were found to have the highest inclination of spending their free time with ASD students because they believed the person to be likeable and of equal intelligence. However, the rest of the student population found peers with ASD characteristics odd and off-putting.

In their article about Autism, Rose Nevill and Susan White suggest a way to improve the acceptance of ASD college students. “Since the 1970s, the Autism Society of America has celebrated April as Autism Awareness month, with the primary goal of educating the public on this disorder and the issues it currently faces with the community. University student organizations could use this month to provide increased information to student bodies on ASD and its increased prevalence. This provision of explanatory information on ASD to students on college campuses can help decrease negative evaluations and promote peer acceptance” (Nevill, 1626).

Raising awareness about Autism is key, especially for young adults attending college. You can show support by reading and sharing articles, using hashtags, painting your nails blue, dying your hair or installing blue light bulbs. Together, we can make a better learning environment for college aged students diagnosed with ASD or HFASD.

 

Sources:

 

Nevill, Rose, and Susan White. “College Students’ Openness Toward Autism Spectrum Disorders: Improving Peer Acceptance.” Journal Of Autism & Developmental Disorders 41.12 (2011): 1619-1628. CINAHL Complete. Web. 13 Apr. 2015.

 

VanBergeijk, E, A Klin, and F Volkmar. “Supporting More Able Students On The Autism Spectrum: College And Beyond.” Journal Of Autism & Developmental Disorders 38.7 (2008): 1359-1370. CINAHL Complete. Web. 13 Apr. 2015.

 

White, Susan W., Thomas H. Ollendick, and Bethany C. Bray. “College Students on the Autism Spectrum.” Sage Publications 15.6 (2011): 683-701. Web. 13 Apr. 2015.

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7 or 13 week Management Training Program in Saratoga Springs – Albany – Online

Are you seeking a promotion at work?  Do you want to become a manager or a better leader?

Take our 7 week or 13 week Management Training Program, or our 1 year Leadership Development program.

Our 7 week program consists of bi-weekly 90 minute live sessions in Saratoga Springs or Albany that can also be viewed live online.  Our 13 week program meets bi weekly for one hour and includes additional topics.

In between class sessions, online assignments and projects will be assigned.

Our 7 week program is $799 and our 13 week program is $1399.  Flexible payment options are available.

For or those seeking further study, we will be offering a 52 week leadership development program for $4999.  Price includes one on one business mentoring.

Classes are facilitated by Robert Braathe, who has worked as a manager and developed managers and staff at Walt Disney World Parks & Resorts, Gap and Apple.

For more information, call us at 518-290-0812 or email us at info@braatheenterprises.com

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